• April 30, 2017
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    The Week in Labor History

    April 24
    The Int’l Longshoremen’s and Warehousemen’s Union halts shipping on the West Coast in solidarity with Mumia Abu-Jamal, a Philadelphia journalist who many believed was on death row because he was an outspoken African-American - 1999

    An eight-story building housing garment factories in Dhaka, Bangladesh collapses, killing 1,129 workers and injuring 2,515.  A day earlier cracks had been found in the structure, but factory officials, who had contracts with Benneton and other major U.S. labels, insisted the workers return to the job the next day - 2013

    April 25
    The New York Times declares the struggle for an 8-hour workday to be “un-American” and calls public demonstrations for the shorter hours “labor disturbances brought about by foreigners.” Other publications declare that an eight-hour workday would bring about “loafing and gambling, rioting, debauchery and drunkenness” - 1886
     
    IWW Marine Transport Workers begin West Coast strike - 1923
     
    The Reverend Ralph David Abernathy and 100 others are arrested while picketing a Charleston, S.C., hospital in a demand for union recognition - 1969
     
    Supreme Court rules that employers may not require female employees to make larger contributions to pension plans in order to obtain the same monthly benefits as men - 1978
     
    April 26
    The U.S. House of Representatives passes House Joint Resolution No. 184, a constitutional amendment to prohibit the labor of persons under 18 years of age. The Senate approved the measure a few weeks later, but it was never ratified by the states and is still technically pending - 1924
    (Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor: Your heart will be broken by this exceptional book’s photographs of children at backbreaking, often life-threatening work, and the accompanying commentary by author Russell Freedman. Photographer Lewis Hine—who himself died in poverty in 1940—did as much, and perhaps more, than any social critic in the early part of the 20th century to expose the abuse of children, as young as three and four, by American capitalism.)
     
    On the orders of President Roosevelt, the U.S. Army seizes the Chicago headquarters of the unionized Montgomery Ward & Co. after management defies the National Labor Relations Board - 1944
     
    April 27
    First strike for 10-hour day, by Boston carpenters - 1825
     
    James Oppenheim’s poem “Bread and Roses” published in IWW newspaper Industrial Solidarity - 1911
     
    President Dwight Eisenhower signs Executive Order 10450: Security Requirements for Government Employment. The order listed “sexual perversion” as a condition for firing a federal employee and for denying employment to potential applicants - 1953

    A cooling tower for a power plant under construction in Willow Island, West Virginia collapses, killing 51 construction workers in what is thought to be the largest construction accident in U.S. history.  OSHA cited contractors for 20 violations, including failures to field test concrete.  The cases were settled for $85,000—about $1,700 per worker killed - 1978
     
    April 28
    Coal mine collapses at Eccles, W.Va., killing 181 workers - 1914
     
    A total of 119 die in Benwood, W.Va., coal mine disaster - 1924
     
    United Wallpaper Craftsmen & Workers of North America merges with Pulp, Sulfite & Paper Mill Workers - 1958
     
    American Federation of Hosiery Workers merges with Textile Workers Union of America - 1965
     
    Congress creates OSHA, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The AFL-CIO sets April 28 as “Workers Memorial Day” to honor all workers killed or injured on the job every year - 1971
     
    First “Take Our Daughters to Work Day,” promoted by the Ms. Foundation, to boost self-esteem of girls with invitations to a parent’s workplace - 1993
     
    April 29
    Coxey’s Army of 500 unemployed civil war veterans reaches Washington, D.C. - 1894
     
    An estimated one thousand silver miners, angry over low wages, the firing of union members and the planting of spies in their ranks by mine owners, seize a train, load it with 3,000 pounds of dynamite, and blow up the mill at the Bunker Hill mine in Wardner, Idaho - 1899
     
    The special representative of the National War Labor Board issues a report, “Retroactive Date for Women’s Pay Adjustments,” setting forth provisions for wage rates for women working in war industries who were asking for equal pay.  Women a year earlier had demanded equal pay for comparable work as that done by men – 1943

    April 30
    An explosion at the Everettville mine in Everettville, W. Va., kills 109 miners, many of whom lie in unmarked graves to this day - 1927
     
    The Obama administration’s National Labor Relations Board implements new rules to speed up unionization elections. The new rules are largely seen as a counter to employer manipulation of the law to prevent workers from unionizing - 2012

    - compiled/edited by David Prosten at Union Communication Services

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  • List of 2012 Legislation Attacking Federal Employees
    Updated On: Feb 29, 2012

    Here is a good list of how congress is attacking Federal Employees in 2012. These are some of the bills in Congress that ACT is watching on your behalf....we need all members to contact their Congressman / Senator and let them know you oppose this type of legislation.

    FEDERAL PAY

    H.R. 270 would impose a mandatory two-week unpaid furlough for federal employees. This bill remains in the hands of a House subcommittee.

    H.R. 3835 would extend the pay freeze for another year. It passed the House on Feb. 1. 2012

    H.R. 3844 would prohibit step increases. The bill has been forwarded to several House committees with jurisdiction over various parts of the legislation. Action is pending.

    H.R. 235 proposes cuts to the federal workforce and a three-year pay freeze. Subcommittee action is pending on this measure.

    S. 2079 would extend the pay freeze for another year. It has been placed on the Senate calendar.

    S. 2065 would extend the pay freeze through June 30, 2014. A Senate committee has the measure.

    S. 1476 would extend the pay freeze through 2014. It has been referred to a Senate committee.

    S. 178 and H.R. 408 would extend the pay freeze through 2015. The Senate bill is under consideration by a committee; the House bill is in the hands of a subcommittee in the house.

    S. 1936 would extend the pay freeze from its present two years to five years. A committee has the bill.

    PENSIONS

    S. 644 would eliminate the defined benefit portion of the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) annuity. A House subcommittee has this measure.

    H.R. 3813 would sharply increase pension contributions, eliminate the FERS supplement and raise pension contributions for new hires. This bill has been cleared for action on the House floor.

    CUTTING THE FEDERAL WORKFORCE

    H.R. 2114 would cut the federal workforce by 10 percent by 2015, while providing a significant loophole for contracting out the work to the private sector. It has been referred to a House subcommittee.

    S. 2065 would reduce the size of government by 5 percent through attrition. This bill is in the hands of the Senate Budget Committee.

    H.R. 657 calls for cuts in the federal workforce. All agencies, other than Defense, Veterans Affairs and Homeland Security—which account for 60 percent of the workforce—would be able to hire only one employee for every two who leave federal service. Subcommittee action is pending.

    H.R. 3029, H.R. 3487 and S. 1476 would reduce the size of the federal government through attrition by permitting the hiring of only one employee for every three who left government service.

    H.R. 3029 has been placed on the House calendar; a House subcommittee has H.R. 3487 and the Senate bill remains in committee.

    H. R. 1779 would prohibit the head of any executive branch agency from hiring in any year in which OMB projects a federal budget deficit. It remains in the hands of a House subcommittee.

    S. 1611 would allow the replacement of three employees who leave federal service by one new employee. It is in committee.

    H.R. 3494 would reduce the size of the federal workforce to no more than that of Oct. 7, 2007. The bill is in a House subcommittee.

    H.R. 3662 would allow the hiring of one employee for every three who leave federal service. It is in the hands of several House committees with jurisdiction over various parts of it.

    S. 178 would, among many other actions, limit the size of the federal workforce and extend the pay freeze through 2015.

    OTHER ISSUES

    S. 261 would cut workers’ compensation payments for older federal employees. Senate committee hearings on this bill have been conducted. Further action is pending.

    H.R. 87 and S. 712 would repeal the financial regulatory reform bill. Both bills are pending either in committee or subcommittee. ACT strongly supports these two Bills. 


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