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July 07, 2015
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Budget Proposal Would Freeze Federal Pay Through 2015
Updated On: Mar 20, 2012

The GOP Budget Proposal Would Freeze Federal Pay Through 2015
By Ian Smith

Tuesday, March 20, 2012 

 below link is from FedSmith

http://www.fedsmith.com/article/3351/gop-budget-proposal-would-freeze-federal.html

 The GOP's 2013 federal budget blueprint released today contains a number of proposed cuts for federal workers including a 10% reduction in the federal workforce and an extended pay freeze through 2015.

The proposed cuts in the budget should not come as a shock. We reported last week that federal employees could expect some form of proposed cuts in the budget, plus given the plethora of proposals that would scale back on the federal workforce ranging from workforce cuts through attrition to freezing step increases that have been suggested since the pay freeze was first proposed by President Obama in 2010, it stands to reason some form of cost cutting via public sector workers would be utilized.

The Proposed Cuts

The budget proposes the following:

  • A 10% workforce reduction over the next three years through attrition
  • Extending the current pay freeze through 2015

It is estimated that these cuts would save taxpayers approximately $368 billion over ten years.

The impetus for these cuts is to slow the rapid growth of the public sector which has been crowding out growth in the private sector. According to the proposal, "The federal government has added 147,000 new workers since the President took office. It is no coincidence that private-­?sector employment continues to grow only sluggishly while the government expands: To pay for the public-­? sector’s growth, Washington must immediately tax the private sector or else borrow and impose taxes later to pay down the debt."

The budget proposal notes, however, that the duties of the federal government do require a strong federal workforce. So while the GOP intends to make cuts, they don't want to take them too far. Hence, the proposal says that "Pay increases and fringe benefits [of the federal workforce] should be reformed to better align with those of their private-sector counterparts."

This statement is referring to the CBO's recent study which shows that public sector wages and benefits continue to outpace those of the private sector, noting that the CBO showed that federal workers receive, on average, 16% higher pay and benefits to comparable workers in the private sector.

"The reforms called for in this budget aim to slow the federal government’s unsustainable growth and reflect the growing frustration of workers across the country at the privileged rules enjoyed by government employees. They reduce the public-­?sector bureaucracy, not through layoffs, but via a gradual, sensible attrition policy," concludes the Budget Committee.

The 2013 budget proposal is nearly identical to the one put forth by the House Budget Committee last year in terms of its approach to reducing the federal workforce. A statement from last year's proposal reads, "[The proposed budget would] boost private-sector employment by slowing the explosive growth of the public sector, achieving a 10 percent reduction over the next three years in the federal workforce through attrition, coupled with a pay freeze for the next five years and reforms to government workers' generous benefit packages."

The Path to Prosperty: FY 2013 Budget Resolution 


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Today’s Labor History
July 02
The first Walmart store opens in Rogers, Ark.  By 2014 the company had 10,000 stores in 27 countries, under 71 different names, employing more than 2 million people.  It is known in the U.S. and most of the other countries in which it operates for low wages and extreme anti-unionism - 1962
(Why Unions Matter: In Why Unions Matter, the author explains why unions still matter in language you can use if you happen to talk with someone who shops or works at Walmart. Yates uses simple language, clear data, and engaging examples to show why workers need unions, how unions are formed, how they operate, how collective bargaining works, the role of unions in politics, and what unions have done to bring workers together across the divides of race, gender, religion, and sexual orientation.)

President Johnson signs Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, forbidding employers and unions from discriminating on the basis of race, color, gender, nationality, or religion - 1964

July 03
Children, employed in the silk mills in Paterson, N.J., go on strike for 11-hour day and 6-day week. A compromise settlement resulted in a 69-hour work week - 1835

Feminist and labor activist Charlotte Perkins Gilman born in Hartford, Conn. Her landmark study, "Women and Economics,” was radical: it called for the financial independence of women and urged a network of child care centers - 1860

July 04
Albert Parsons joins the Knights of Labor. He later became an anarchist and was one of the Haymarket martyrs - 1876

Five newspaper boys from the Baltimore Evening Sun died when the steamer they were on, the Three Rivers, caught fire near Baltimore, Md.  They are remembered every year at a West Baltimore cemetery, toasted by former staffers of the now-closed newspaper - 1924

With the Great Depression underway, some 1,320 delegates attended the founding convention of the Unemployed Councils of the U.S.A., organized by the U.S. Communist Party.  They demanded passage of unemployment insurance and maternity benefit laws and opposed discrimination by race or sex - 1930

Two primary conventions of the United Nations' Int’l Labor Organization come into force: Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organize - 1950

Building trades workers lay the cornerstone of the Freedom Tower on the site of the World Trade Center in New York City.  - 2004

July 05
During a strike against the Pullman Palace Car Company, which had drastically reduced wages, buildings constructed for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago's Jackson Park were set ablaze, reducing seven to ashes - 1894

West Coast Longshoremen's Strike, Battle of Rincon Hill, San Francisco. Some 5,000 strikers fought 1,000 police, scabs and national guardsmen.  Two strikers were killed, 109 people injured.  The incident, forever known as "Bloody Thursday," led to a general strike – 1934

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the National Labor Relations Act - 1935

Three firefighters, a state policeman and an employee of Doxol Gas in Kingman, Arizona are killed in a propane gas explosion.  Eight more firefighters were to die of burns suffered in the event – 1973

Fourteen firefighters are killed battling the South Canyon Fire on Storm King Mountain in Glenwood Springs, Colo. - 1994

- compiled/edited by David Prosten, Union Communication Services 

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