• June 30, 2016
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    Today In Labor History:

    What is to be a 7-day streetcar strike begins in Chicago after several workers are unfairly fired. Wrote the police chief at the time, describing the strikers’ response to scabs: "One of my men said he was at the corner of Halsted and Madison Streets, and although he could see fifty stones in the air, he couldn't tell where they were coming from." The strike was settled to the workers’ satisfaction - 1885
    -photo (left): illustrations of Chicago Streetcar Strike
     
    An executive order signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt establishes the National Labor Relations Board.  A predecessor organization, the National Labor Board, established by the Depression-era National Industrial Recovery Act in 1933, had been struck down by the Supreme Court - 1934

    -photo(left): President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the National Labor Relations Act. Looking on, from left, are U.S. Rep. Theodore A. Peyser, U.S. Labor Secretary Frances Perkins and U.S. Sen. Robert F. Wagner.
     
    IWW strikes Weyerhauser and other Idaho lumber camps - 1936
     
    Jesus Pallares, founder of the 8,000-member coal miners union, Liga Obrera de Habla Espanola, is deported as an "undesirable alien." The union operated in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado - 1936
     
    The Boilermaker and Blacksmith unions merge to become Int’l Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers - 1954

     
    The newly-formed Jobs With Justice stages its first big support action, backing 3,000 picketing Eastern Airlines mechanics at Miami Airport - 1987
     
    The U.S. Supreme Court rules in CWA v. Beck that, in a union security agreement, a union can collect as dues from non-members only that money necessary to perform its duties as a collective bargaining representative - 1988
     
    June 30
    Alabama outlaws the leasing of convicts to mine coal, a practice that had been in place since 1848. In 1898, 73 percent of the state's total revenue came from this source. 25 percent of all Black leased convicts died - 1928

    -photo(right): Convict Miners, Alabama, circa 1900
     
    The Walsh-Healey Act took effect today. It requires companies that supply goods to the government to pay wages according to a schedule set by the Secretary of Labor - 1936
     
    The storied Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, a union whose roots traced back to the militant Western Federation of Miners, and which helped found the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), merges into the United Steelworkers of America - 1967
     
    Up to 40,000 New York construction workers demonstrated in midtown Manhattan, protesting the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s awarding of a $33 million contract to a nonunion company. Eighteen police and three demonstrators were injured. "There were some scattered incidents and some minor violence," Police Commissioner Howard Safir told the New York Post. "Generally, it was a pretty well-behaved crowd." – 1998
    (Skilled Hands, Strong Spirits follows the history of the Building and Construction Trades Department of the AFL-CIO from the emergence of building trades councils to the age of the skyscraper. It takes the reader through treacherous fights over jurisdiction as new building materials and methods of work evolved and describes numerous Department campaigns to improve safety standards, work with contractors to promote unionized construction, and forge a sense of industrial unity among its fifteen (and at times nineteen) autonomous and highly diverse affiliates.)

    Nineteen firefighters die when they are overtaken by a wildfire they are battling in a forest northwest of Phoenix, Ariz.  It was the deadliest wildfire involving firefighters in the U.S. in at least 30 years - 2013
     

    - compiled/edited by David Prosten at Union Communication Services.
     

  • Dear Colleague & Vote No Letters to Congress
    Updated On: Feb 13, 2013

    All,

    see attached two letters to Congressmen from their Colleague's Mr. Connolly & Mr. Cummings & Mr. Wolf.

    Mr. Wolf seeks ALL to vote NO on HR 273 and says it quite nicely "...this bill is nothing more than a political stunt that targets the hardworking dedicated men and women of the civil service, who have already had their salaries frozen for more than two years"...

    and Mr. Connolly & Mr. Cummings letter asks members of congress to extend the current pay freeze for themselves, Members of Congress, and not federal employees through 2013...we don't know the bill number just yet as it has not been assigned since it is being dropped in the hopper today...stay tuned...thanks, Terry


    Download:
    2013-2-12 Dear Coll - Member Pay Freeze - signed 02-12-13.pdf
    2013-2-12 WOLF VOTE NO ON HR 273.pdf

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