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July 07, 2015
Action Center
Official Time Talking Points
Posted On: Jun 12, 2013
...All...Talking Points on Official Time for using to call your Congressman is listed below and attached so you can print out the attached pdf and hand it out to membership so they can make the calls...this NEEDS to be done TOMORROW (Thursday June 13th)...call the Capitol Switch Board at (202) 224-3121 and ask for your Congressman's office and then ask to speak to the legislative aide and tell them you oppose Mr. Gingrey’s amendment to HR 1960...Talking Points below...thanks & KTF, Terry

Background on Official Time:

In exchange for the legal responsibility of providing services to those who pay as well as those who refuse to pay, the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 incorporated the concept of “official time.” (5 U.S.C. § 7131.)

The official time law provides three separate rights:

  1. A right to use official time for collective bargaining;
  2. A right to have the FLRA determine the amount of official time that will be allowed for FLRA proceedings; and
  3. A right to negotiate agreements providing official time for both collective bargaining and other representational duties—such as investigating and pursuing employee grievances, participating in labor-management forums under Executive Order 13522, and representing federal employees in discrimination cases. 

Uses of Official Time:

  • Employee groups use official time to represent employees in discrimination and merit principle proceedings, conflict resolution, and implementation of workplace policies.

  • Official time for representational duties allows employee representatives to handle sensitive workplace issues faster than the normal bureaucratic process would allow, resolving issues more efficiently.

  • Unions participate in national and agency-level partnership councils which work together to improve the efficiency and delivery of government services to the American people.


Why Official Time is Necessary:

  • By law, federal unions are obligated to represent bargaining unit members regardless of their status as dues-payers or not. Without the resources available to effectively represent all employees, official time becomes a critical element in performing representational duties.

  • Targeting official time would severely restrict, and eventually eliminate, employees’ collective bargaining rights in the federal sector as we currently understand them. This would lead not only to a loss of rights for federal workers, but also greater inefficiency in the delivery of government services to the taxpayer.

Official Time is a Good Deal for the Taxpayers:

  • Federal employees and their union representatives improve efficiency and boost employee morale in the federal workplace.

  • Strong employee-employer communication is a necessary precondition for good government. Official time allows both labor and management to work constructively toward a more efficient and accountable federal workplace.

  • When federal workers are allowed to bargain collectively, they speak their concerns with one voice, lending itself to a more organized and efficient employer-employee dynamic.

Download:
Union Official Time Talking Points Memo.pdf

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Today's Labor History
July 7
Striking New York longshoremen meet to discuss ways to keep new immigrants from scabbing. They were successful, at least for a time. On July 14, 500 newly arrived Jews marched straight from their ship to the union hall. On July 15, 250 Italian immigrants stopped scabbing on the railroad and joined the union - 1882
  
Mary Harris "Mother" Jones begins "The March of the Mill Children,” when, accompanied part of the way by children, she walked from Philadelphia to President Theodore Roosevelt's home on Long Island to protest the plight of child laborers. One of her demands: reduce the children’s work week to 55 hours - 1903 
Photo courtesy of Kheel Center
 
Cloak makers begin what is to be a 2-month strike against New York City sweatshops - 1910

Workers begin construction on the Boulder Dam (now known as Hoover Dam) on the Colorado River, during the Great Depression.  Wages and conditions were horrible—16 workers and work camp residents died of the heat over just a single 30-day period—and two strikes over the four years of construction led to only nominal improvements in pay and conditions - 1931
 
Some 500,000 people participate when a two-day general strike is called in Puerto Rico by more than 60 trade unions and many other organizations. They are protesting privatization of the island's telephone company - 1998

July 8
First anthracite coal strike in U.S. - 1842
  
Labor organizer Ella Reeve "Mother" Bloor born on Staten Island, N.Y. Among her activities: investigating child labor in glass factories and mines, and working undercover in meat packing plants to verify for federal investigators the nightmarish working conditions that author Upton Sinclair had revealed in The Jungle - 1862
 
The Pacific Mail Steamship Co. fires all employees who had been working an 8-hour day, then joins with other owners to form the "Ten-Hour League Society" for the purpose of uniting all mechanics "willing to work at the old rates, neither unjust to the laborers nor ruinous to the capital and enterprise of the city and state." The effort failed - 1867
 
Founding convention of the Industrial Workers of the World (I.W.W., or Wobblies) concludes in Chicago. Charles O. Sherman, a former American Federation of Labor organizer, is elected president - 1905
(Rebel Voices: An IWW Anthology: Originally published in 1964 and long out of print, Rebel Voices remains by far the biggest and best source on IWW history, fiction, songs, art, and lore.  This edition includes 40 pages of additional material from the 1998 Charles H. Kerr edition by Fred Thompson and Franklin Rosemont, and a new preface by Wobbly organizer Daniel Gross.)
 
Some 35,000 members of the Machinists union begin what is to become a 43-day strike that shuts down five major U.S. airlines, about three-fifths of domestic air traffic.  The airlines were thriving, and wages were a key issue in the fight - 1966

 

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