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January 27, 2015
Official Time Talking Points
Posted On: Jun 12, 2013
...All...Talking Points on Official Time for using to call your Congressman is listed below and attached so you can print out the attached pdf and hand it out to membership so they can make the calls...this NEEDS to be done TOMORROW (Thursday June 13th)...call the Capitol Switch Board at (202) 224-3121 and ask for your Congressman's office and then ask to speak to the legislative aide and tell them you oppose Mr. Gingrey’s amendment to HR 1960...Talking Points below...thanks & KTF, Terry

Background on Official Time:

In exchange for the legal responsibility of providing services to those who pay as well as those who refuse to pay, the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 incorporated the concept of “official time.” (5 U.S.C. § 7131.)

The official time law provides three separate rights:

  1. A right to use official time for collective bargaining;
  2. A right to have the FLRA determine the amount of official time that will be allowed for FLRA proceedings; and
  3. A right to negotiate agreements providing official time for both collective bargaining and other representational duties—such as investigating and pursuing employee grievances, participating in labor-management forums under Executive Order 13522, and representing federal employees in discrimination cases. 

Uses of Official Time:

  • Employee groups use official time to represent employees in discrimination and merit principle proceedings, conflict resolution, and implementation of workplace policies.

  • Official time for representational duties allows employee representatives to handle sensitive workplace issues faster than the normal bureaucratic process would allow, resolving issues more efficiently.

  • Unions participate in national and agency-level partnership councils which work together to improve the efficiency and delivery of government services to the American people.


Why Official Time is Necessary:

  • By law, federal unions are obligated to represent bargaining unit members regardless of their status as dues-payers or not. Without the resources available to effectively represent all employees, official time becomes a critical element in performing representational duties.

  • Targeting official time would severely restrict, and eventually eliminate, employees’ collective bargaining rights in the federal sector as we currently understand them. This would lead not only to a loss of rights for federal workers, but also greater inefficiency in the delivery of government services to the taxpayer.

Official Time is a Good Deal for the Taxpayers:

  • Federal employees and their union representatives improve efficiency and boost employee morale in the federal workplace.

  • Strong employee-employer communication is a necessary precondition for good government. Official time allows both labor and management to work constructively toward a more efficient and accountable federal workplace.

  • When federal workers are allowed to bargain collectively, they speak their concerns with one voice, lending itself to a more organized and efficient employer-employee dynamic.

Download:
Union Official Time Talking Points Memo.pdf

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This Week in Labor History

January 26

In what could be considered the first workers’ compensation agreement in America, pirate Henry Morgan pledges his underlings 600 pieces of eight or six slaves to compensate for a lost arm or leg. Also part of the pirate’s code, reports Roger Newell: shares of the booty were equal regardless of race or sex, and shipboard decisions were made collectively - 1695
 

Samuel Gompers, first AFL president, born in London, England. He emigrated to the U.S. as a youth - 1850


The Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America is chartered by the American Federation of Labor to organize "every wage earner from the man who takes the bullock at the house until it goes into the hands of the consumer." - 1897

Workers win a two-day sit-down strike at the Brooklyn electric plant that powers the city's entire subway system - 1937


A handful of American companies announce nearly 60,000 layoffs today, as the recession that began during the George W. Bush presidency charges full-tilt toward what became known as the Great Recession – 2009

(Union Strategies for Hard Times, 2nd Edition: What can unions do as the fallout of the Great Recession continues to ravage workers and their unions and threatens to destroy decades of collective bargaining gains? What must local union leaders do to help their laid off members, protect those still working, and prevent the gutting of their hard-fought contracts—and their very unions themselves? Bill Barry, until recently director of labor studies at the Community College of Baltimore County and a 40-year veteran of the movement, calls on his long history of activism and years of "what works, what doesn’t" discussions with other leaders to come up with a plan to survive these terrible times and even use crisis to build a better future.)


January 27

New York City maids organize to improve working conditions - 1734


Mine explosion in Mount Pleasant, Pa., leaves more than 100 dead - 1891


First meeting of the Int’l Labor Organization (ILO) - 1920


Kansas miners strike against compulsory arbitration - 1920


A 3¢ postage stamp is issued, honoring AFL founder Samuel Gompers – 1950

(There is Power in a Union: The Epic Story of Labor in America is the sympathetic, thoughtful and highly readable history of the American labor movement traces unionism from the textile mills of Lowell, Massachusetts in the 1820s to organized labor’s decline in the 1980s and struggle for survival and growth today.)


A group of Detroit African-American auto workers known as the Eldon Avenue Axle Plant Revolutionary Union Movement leads a wildcat strike against racism and bad working conditions.  They are critical of both automakers and the UAW, condemning the seniority system and grievance procedures as racist – 1969


Pete Seeger dies in New York at age 94. A musician and activist, he was a revered figure on the American left, persecuted during the McCarthy era for his support of  progressive, labor and civil rights causes. A prolific songwriter, he is generally credited with popularizing the civil rights anthem “We Shall Overcome.” He actively participated in demonstrations until shortly before his death - 2014


Members of the Northwestern University football team announce they are seeking union recognition. A majority signed cards, later delivered to the National Labor Relations Board office in Chicago, asking for representation by the College Athletes Players Association - 2014

— Compiled and edited by David Prosten, Union Communication Services

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